Today we wanted to feature Jason Ray – creator of the BotBQ, 3D printing pioneer, and a really nice guy.

Follow his journey on twitter @BotBQ

We got the chance to chat with Jason last week via Google hangouts and learned more about his meat extruder. By the way, the BotBQ is open source. Although it is still at an early stage, you can get all the plans right here.  Jason’s project is all about helping the community delve deeper into paste extrusion – something we at Structur3d truly respect.

The following is a brief synopsis of Jason’s personal findings in extruding hamburger meat. If you do decide to experiment with it, these are issues you can avoid from the start.

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1.       Meat inconsistency

Hamburger meat is a lumpy, heterogeneous substance.  There are limitations to how consistent and dense you can get it. The trick is to get a fine grind. This decreases the number of air pockets encased in the housing, allowing you to get a nice, steady flow.

Recommendation: Grind the meat 4 to 6 times before stuffing it into the housing.

2.       Small nozzle size

In this video originally featured in 3D Printing Industry, Jason tests out a couple different nozzle sizes – 3mm, 7.5mm, and 9mm. A smaller nozzle size requires too much pressure from your motor – putting it in danger of over-exertion.

Recommendation: Opt for a nozzle size 9mm and above unless you are working with a very powerful mechanism.

3.       Friction

Due to the physical make-up of the hamburger meat, it is difficult to push through even a wide nozzle. When choosing the type of beef, Jason finds “the fattier, the better.” Adding a bit more oil to it as well as greasing the housing helps it extrude even better.

Recommendation: Choose a fattier beef and grease up the housing.


Keep the learning going! 

If you have any tips / experiences to share on printing meat-like substances, be sure to post on our forum.

To learn more about Jason, check out this great interview over at 3DigitalCooks